I’ll start the bidding at…

>I often browse the auction calendar just to keep aware of what is coming up and how much books and manuscripts are selling for. This coming Tuesday’s sale put on by the New England Book Auction folks promises to be very interesting. You can check out the catalogue on the Americana Exchange website (one of many great services offered there):
http://www.americanaexchange.com/NewAE/auction/auctiondetail.asp?m=10&aid=2773

Aside from a really nice mix of rare books and reference material, several lots of manuscript material caught my eye–especially the Edgar Allen Poe material (I’m glad I am not collecting Poe manuscripts!):

Lot 203:
POE, EDGAR ALLAN. Autograph manuscript fragment from “Masque of the Red Death.” 1 page. 3-9/16 x 2-1/2 inches, written in ink in a cursive script on recto only; moderate wear.
Lot Note:
The 7-line text comprises the middle of the third paragraph, describing the room in which the Masque was to be presented. “The Masque of the Red Death. A Fantasy” was published in Graham s Lady’s and Gentleman s Magazine in May 1842. The word “Mask” in the title was changed to “Masque” in Broadway Magazine’s publication of the tale in July 1845. No other manuscript copies or fragments are known to exist. Estimate: $10,000 – 15,000

Lot 204:
POE, EDGAR ALLAN. Autograph manuscript fragment of “The Black Cat.” 1 leaf. 4 x 6-5/6 inches, written in a cursive hand on recto only; moderate wear, creased at fold.
Lot Note:
The manuscript is numbered “II” at the top of the page and consists of 18 lines comprising the end of the first and the beginning of the second paragraphs. The text of the first paragraph differs slightly from that in the first edition of the Works (1850) – in the published edition the word “barroques ” appears; in the manuscript it is “baroques. ” F. O. C. Darley saw a manuscript roll of the tale in 1843, when Poe read the story to him, but no one has seen that copy since. “The Black Cat” was written in late 1842 or early 1843. It was published by the United States Post on August 19, 1843. Estimate: $15,000 – 25,000

Lot 205:
POE, EDGAR ALLAN. Autograph manuscript fragment of “The Conqueror Worm,” signed by Poe. 1 leaf. 7-1/4×6 inches, written in ink in a cursive hand on recto only; moderate wear, creased at fold.
Lot Note:
Manuscript of the fourth and fifth stanzas of “The Conqueror Worm, ” signed at the bottom “Edgar A. Poe. Deer. 9, 1842. ” It was first published in January 1843 in Graham’s Magazaine, and was later incorporated in “Ligeia ” in several other periodicals. The Poe Society’s website notes that no manuscripts or fragments are known to exist. Running down the right margin is a 4-line inscription in a different hand: “published Jan. 1843 in/ Graham’s Magazine/ also in Broadway Journal/ J.R. Thompson. ” Thompson was the publisher of the Southern Literary Messenger. Poe met him in 1848 and suggested that he might contribute to the magazine. Thompson was also known to have a manuscript copy of “Annabel Lee, ” which Poe gave him to settle a five-dollar debt. Estimate: $20,000 – 30,000

Lot 206
POE, EDGAR ALLAN. Autograph manuscript fragment of “The Conqueror Worm,” signed by Poe. 1 leaf. 7-1/4×6 inches, written in ink in a cursive hand on recto only; moderate wear, creased at fold.
Lot Note:
Manuscript of the fourth and fifth stanzas of “The Conqueror Worm, ” signed at the bottom “Edgar A. Poe. Deer. 9, 1842. ” It was first published in January 1843 in Graham’s Magazaine, and was later incorporated in “Ligeia ” in several other periodicals. The Poe Society’s website notes that no manuscripts or fragments are known to exist. Running down the right margin is a 4-line inscription in a different hand: “published Jan. 1843 in/ Graham’s Magazine/ also in Broadway Journal/ J.R. Thompson. ” Thompson was the publisher of the Southern Literary Messenger. Poe met him in 1848 and suggested that he might contribute to the magazine. Thompson was also known to have a manuscript copy of “Annabel Lee, ” which Poe gave him to settle a five-dollar debt. Estimate: $30,000 – 50,000

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s